Lawyers Breaking Law

Corrupt Lawyers

Corrupt Lawyers

It looks like judges are being taught how not to write properly on purpose. That is why I admire my colleagues from the editorial office even more as they know how to catch the gist of a case even though they have to wade through long-winded court materials that sometimes run into several hundred pages. And they do not lose the meaning along the way. Imagine my surprise, when I accidentally encountered a ‘gem’ that I found on a Facebook page of a legal firm. After a few clicks I quickly discovered that most posts were copied from professional journals. The firm in question, run by legal advisers and lawyers (for the sake of clarity I wish to add), praises itself on avoiding unnecessary legal jargon. Therefore, in their eyes, it seems logical to use texts written by journalists. Why should they waste time and money; it is better to use something someone has done already, and that has been done better. Increasingly more lawyers do this. The web is awash with posts that are not texts that they have not authored themselves, but are scans or PDF files of whole pages from periodicals. Lawyers do it for several reasons: their own comments can be found in the texts; the problem described therein matches the nature of their work; they find the material interesting, or even because the article contains a nice picture. And, of course, a Facebook page has to contain something. These lawyers do not seem to mind the the fact that newspaper articles (or blogs) are protected by copyright.
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