Water Beats Cola

Can't Beat Water

Can’t Beat Water

Pupils in Radom schools no longer prefer fizzy drinks thank to the installation of drinking fountains which provide young people with fresh, clean tap water. The project, sponsored by the EU, which cost more than PLN 70,000 has been a hit with kids. According to Karol Semik, deputy mayor of Radom, interest in the undertaking is growing as representatives of local government continue to ask about the installation of drinking fountains in schools. Most importantly, however, is the fact that pupils are not forced to drink water but happily do so, much to their parents’ great joy, who eagerly supported the initiative. The drinking fountains were first installed in easily accessible places in 10 schools, after which school children began switching from sugar-filled fizzy drinks to water. Consequently, local authorities in Radom decided to install fountains in every primary, middle and high school and other in institutions which were interested in the project. In effect, the city of Radom has taken the first step to being one of Poland’s healthiest cities.
finanse.wp.pl

Polish Export to Spain Increase

Poland's Main Export

Poland’s Chief Export

After Russia banned the import of products from Poland, Polish companies have been seeking other export opportunities. Spain has turned out to be one of Poland’s best partners and could soon become one of the five top export markets for Poland, according to Puls Biznesu. According to Marcin Luziński, a BZ WBK economist, Spain has undertaken several structural reforms and this has triggered faster economic growth. From January to April 2015, the export of Polish products to Spain increased by 22%, which positioned Spain as the seventh largest importer of Polish goods. First place is still occupied by Germany, where the export of Polish commodities increased by 9%; then the United Kingdom with an increased of 10.5%; and the Czech Republic, where Polish imports increased by 13.1%. Experts believe that Poland will soon begin making a greater impact on markets in the Middle East, the Far East, Africa and South America.
tvn24bis.pl

 

70% of Poles Against Euro

Euro Threat

Euro Threat

According to CBOS report, 70% of Poles are against the adoption of the euro and 25% are for it. This number of euro opponents is at its highest level ever. “Reluctance to the euro is still not decreasing in Poland and the proportion of opponents is the highest ever recorded,” according to the report. It also states: “Interestingly, objection to adopting the euro is not only rising but also more categorically expressed (with more people answering ‘definitely not’ than ‘rather not'”. CBOS notes that the greatest support for replacing the złoty with the euro was reported in January 2002 (64%), before Poland’s accession to the EU. “In 2007-2008, supporters and opponents for the adoption of the European currency were at similar levels. In the first quarter of 2009, following the accession of Slovakia to the euro zone and during discussion on the possibility and legitimacy of rapid adoption of the euro by Poland, support for the introduction of the common currency rose to 52-53%,” the CBOS report states.
onet.pl

Poland Supports Turkey’s EU Aspirations

EU Head Donald Tusk

EU Head Donald Tusk

In 2009, Donald Tusk former Polish Prime Minister and current President of the European Council, said Poland supports Turkey’s intention to join the European Union. After meeting Turkish PM Recep Erdogan in Warsaw both Prime Ministers signed a declaration on Polish-Turkish strategic partnership. Tusk assured the Turkish PM that “Poland will be actively participating in the process of negotiation and integration between Turkey and the EU.” Tusk said, “We both strongly believe that Turkish EU aspirations will have a positive outcome.” Erdogan thanked Tusk for the support Poland has been giving to Turkey on its way towards the EU. “Poland has always supported our EU aspirations. It has now been six years since I became Prime Minister. And for six years now, I see their strong support,” said Erdogan. Now with Donald Tusk heading the European Council and a new Polish President, it will be interesting to see if this support is still forthcoming.
gazetaprawna.pl

€82bn for Poland

Show Me the Money

Show Me the Money

For the period 2014-2020 Poland has at its disposal €82.5bn from EU funds. Preparations for the use of these resources is about to come to an end. A series of articles published in Dziennik Gazeta Prawna  will discuss how to make use of these resources. European funds support infrastructure, economic and social development of less developed EU states, which includes Poland. Specific and defined funds are granted for investment plans and the current investment period is for 2014-2020, however, the actual implementation of such projects can be completed as late as 2023. The way in which resources from EU funds will be invested in Poland is determined in the ‘Partnership Agreement’. The tools for the implementation of this plan can be found in both national and regional programmes. The key ‘Partnership Agreement’ document was approved by the European Commission on 23 May 2014. It is pointed out therein that to enable Poland’s greatest possible development the following key factors need to be addressed: (1) increasing the competitiveness of the economy; (2) improving the social and territorial cohesion of the country; (3) improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the state.
biznes.gazetaprawna.pl

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Polish Specialists Abroad

Poland's Greatest Export

Poland’s Greatest Export

As many as a quarter of a million specialists across Europe changed their place of residence in the period 2003-2013 in order to find work. Poland lost the greatest number of workers. “40,000 highly qualified Polish people left home in order to find a job abroad. The most popular destinations for these new immigrants were Great Britain, Germany and Belgium. More than 50% of those who left specialised in professions in the healthcare industry,” we read in Gazeta Wyborcza. Unfortunately, it seems that Poland will not replace these people anytime soon – only 2,000 specialists have arrived in Poland from other countries of the EU to find work. When it comes to countries outside the EU, mainly Ukrainians come to Poland to work in agriculture.

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Poland Wins Research Race

Heading Research

Heading Research

According to Nature, Poland has become a scientific leader within Central Europe. In terms of scientific publications, Poland has moved ahead of the Czech Republic and Romania but as far as investment in research is concerned Poland still lags behind other CEE states. 25 years after the fall of communism, researchers have found themselves in a more stable situation. In the past decade, many counties have rebuilt their economies, which in turn has allowed governments to invest more money in the development of science. “EU membership has been a major driver of change,” emphasises Nature. In 2004, the EU welcomed eight former communist states, including Poland, Estonia and Hungary. Three years later Bulgaria and Romania joined the EU and Croatia in 2014. One in five EU citizens is from one of these new member states. As Nature stresses, the huge financial injection from EU structural funds was designed to reduce economic and social disparities between different regions of Europe. According to data from Scopus, Polish scientists and academics published nearly 30,000 papers last year – three times more than those in the Czech Republic or Romania. However, this is still dwarfed by Germany and the UK whose scientists and academics publish five times more. Nature estimates that Poland, which has undergone rapid economic and scientific growth, is taking the lead in Central Europe. The authors of the report give Wrocław Research Centre EIT+ as an example of the positive transformation. At the same time, the authors claim that there are major distinctions between different nations. Poland undertakes far more research nowadays and is fast becoming a political and economic powerhouse in the region. Estonia is now reaping the benefits of investment because the country reformed its research system relatively early on. Hungary, on the other hand, managed better during communism but now there is a lack of appropriate investment in science and research.
fakty.interia.pl

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