Jesus Pales in Comparison

New Idol?

New Idol?

Father John Bashobora, the controversial priest from Uganda, is coming to Poland. On 4 July, he will appear at a stadium in Zamość, where, for the price of PLN 40 (plus an optional donation of PLN 10), his followers will get to spend the entire day in his company. Out of 8,000 tickets available, 90% have already sold out. Bashobora has a PhD in theology and is a member of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal movement. He claims to have both healing powers and the ability to bring people back from the dead. It is not Bashobora’s first visit to Poland. Only a year ago, 58,000 people welcomed him at the National Stadium in Warsaw at the invitation of Archbishop Henryk Hoser’s. In 2009, Bashobora was supposed to appear in Lublin, but the meeting was cancelled due to the vocal protests of the late Archbishop Józef Życiński, who said: “While visiting Lublin, another priest from Uganda informed me with a soft, compassionate smile that this supposed miracle-worker is much better known in Poland than in Africa. If one were to rank Christ against Bashobora, Christ would pale in comparison, as amongst the people Jesus raised from the dead, one would not find as many as 26, which is the number attributed to our guest from Uganda.”
Gazeta Wyborcza

India is the New Direction

Rupees to Poland?

Rupees to Poland?

On 26 March 2015 discussion panels entitled “New export directions” and “Export chances for Polish companies” took place in Business Link Warszawa. The participants included Ryszard Sznajder, president of the Polish-Indian Chamber of Commerce; Michael Dembiński, chief advisor of the British-Polish Chamber of Commerce; Dariusz Karwowski, chief project manager of the Polish Information and Foreign Investment Agency (PAIiIZ) and Piotr Soroczyński, chief economist at Export Credit Insurance Corporation (KUKE). Ryszard Sznajder mentioned that most Polish companies are still not interested in cooperating with India and the trade balance is still low despite its expansion, which clearly illustrates this attitude. Furthermore, Polish enterprises should use the fact that Indians are generally positive Poland. Sznajder encouraged Polish business to show an interest in the Indian market and its almost unlimited possibilities. Other topics covered were the Russian embargo on food imported from Poland, which started another discussion on how to support exporters. There was also a discussion on new market goals and the promotion of Polish exports in China.
piig-poland.org

Turkey – Poland’s Main Asian Partner

Celebrating Good Relations

Celebrating Good Relations

Despite declining trade by approximately 8% in 2002, Turkey still remains Poland’s main trade partner in the Middle East and Asia. Warsaw recently hosted a meeting between Turkish government representatives and business. This coincided with the official visit of the Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Poland. He was joined by Turkish business people representing the construction, energy, textile, logistics, food, and jewellery sectors. Turkey as well as Canada, Brazil, Algeria, and Kazakhstan are key new directions for Poland in terms of export. The Ministry of Economy has spent PLN 15 million in European Union funds promoting these countries. Thanks to this, Polish businesses have participated in a host of financed fairs and trade missions to Turkey. Last year, Poland exported €2.3 billion worth of products to Turkey. In comparison, Polish exports to the Czech Republic, which has a population almost eight times smaller than Turkey, amounted to €9 billion. Ankara currently prides itself on being one of the fastest growing economies in Europe. According to the World Bank, in 2010 the growth of the Turkish economy amounted to 8.2% GDP; in 2011 it was 8.5%. According to the International Monetary Fund, the GDP of Turkey will increase by 3.8% this year and by 3.5% the following year. In 2010, Polish-Turkish trade amounted to $4.6 billion, of which export constituted $2.5 billion and was higher by 42% in comparison to export in 2009. This trend continued in 2011 when trade amounted to $5.6 billion, of which export constituted $3.3 billion and increased by 33%.
forbes.pl

Polish Food Industry in Hong Kong

Hong Kong Appeal

Hong Kong Appeal

Polish companies are looking for investment opportunities outside Europe, most recently in Hong Kong. “Hong Kong has for several years been a gateway for our grocery industry into China,” says Lucjan Zwolak vice-chairman of the Agricultural Market Agency. Annually, Poland exports goods worth approximately €70 million to Hong Kong, but the potential is considerably greater. In order to make use of this potential, Polish companies will present themselves at the Food-Expo tradefair, which begins 14 August in Hong Kong. It is one of the most important food industry trade fairs and exhibitions in Asia. Eight companies, including Okręgowa Spółdzielnia Mleczarska Łowicz and Słowianka will present their goods as part of the Agricultural Market Agency stall. 15 butcheries will present their products as part of the Association of Craftsmen and Smoked Meat Producers stall. “We have had twice as many applications as there are places,” says the deputy chairman of the Association of Craftsmen and Smoked Meat Producers. Conquering new markets is particularly important for butcheries today. Due to the outbreak of the African swine fever virus in Lithuania, then in the Podlasie area in Poland, the import of pork from infected areas was stopped in Russia, China and Japan. The meat industry estimates that in the first half of 2015, the value of pork exports could fall by 20%. Similar problems may soon be faced by fruit and vegetable producers, because from 1 August Russia will impose a ban on the import of Polish apples and cabbage. The Middle East also provides good perspectives for the meat industry. Krzysztof Jażdżewski, deputy Chief Veterinary Officer announced that the chances of exporting more beef to the Middle East are increasing. Moreover, there are more countries that are ready to accept the stunning of animals in slaughterhouses, which is required by Polish law. It is also possible that in the coming months this solution will be accepted in Saudi Arabia. Polish veterinaries are also in touch with inspectors in the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait. Polish beef might also appear in North Africa. Agreeing a model veterinary certificate with Tunisia is currently pending. In July, Algeria will open its market for Polish beef. Also from July, Japan will resume the import of Polish beef. “This process has taken over five years to complete. It shows how time-consuming it is to obtain export rights,” said Jażdżewski.
ekonomia.rp.pl

Belarusian Oil for Poland?

Working with Belarus

Working with Belarus

According to Defence24.pl, Belarus has started building the Mozyr-Brest pipeline which could potentially open up a supply of inexpensive petroleum products to Poland. At the end of last year, Gomeltransneft Druzhba, which controls the Belarussian part of the Druzhba pipeline, returned to the old project. The Mozyr-Brest pipeline would give Poland access to petroleum products from the Mozyr refinery which will probably use Caspian oil, supplied by the Odessa-Brody pipeline. Despite the fact that preliminary agreements between Warsaw and Minsk were made back in 2004, the project was subsequently abandoned. Belarus was unable to provide Poland with a reliable oil supply because of its own dependence on Russian oil. It seems the Belarusians have found a way to circumvent their problems with Russia by supplying oil from the Caspian Sea directly to the refinery in Mozyr. According to Defence24.pl, Gomeltransneft has returned to this project as a part of a Belarusian intended energy turn. Thanks to the import of oil from the Black Sea area through the Odessa-Brody pipeline, Belarus has now access to raw materials from a source other than Russia. The raw materials will be processed by the refinery in Mozyr. After that, they could be supplied to Poland through the Mozyr-Brest pipeline, which would present a lucrative opportunity to the Belarusian petrochemical sector, as Belarus has ceased to supply its products to Russia because of the fall of the rouble.
gazeta.pl

Polish-Japanese Cooperation

Door to Japan

Door to Japan

Japan is currently the third largest Asian trade partner for Poland with turnover reaching approximately €3bn. “I encourage Japanese entrepreneurs to increase the realisation of projects in Poland,” said Jerzy Pietrewicz of the Polish Ministry of Economy, during the opening of the Polish-Japanese Economic Forum. The meeting took place on 27 February 2015 in Tokyo and was a key part of Bronisław Komorowski’s programme of visits in Japan. Deputy Minister Pietrewicz pointed out that Poland is an attractive location for investment within Europe. “Japanese companies have noticed the opportunities that result from investing in our country. Nearly 300 enterprises with Japanese capital have been registered in Poland, and the cumulative value of Japanese investments in Poland has exceeded $1.5bn,” he said, “I believe that a better understanding of our investment possibilities as well as the strengths of the Polish economy will result in market growth.” he added. Deputy Minister Pietrewicz has also stressed that providing the best conditions for investment in strategic fields of the economy is among the top priorities of the Ministry of Economy. In trying to meet investor expectations we have created a number of tools supporting the development of investment in Poland. We have implemented, among others, new regulations that simplify and expedite the process of undertaking business in Poland,” he said. Special Economic Zones play an important part in supporting entrepreneurship as they offer beneficial tax breaks, or sites ready for construction,” he added. During his stay in Japan, Pietrewicz met with the Prime Minister of Japan Shinzō Abe and representatives of Japanese business. He also took part in a Polish-Japanese meeting on clean coal technologies. The main aim of the meeting was to investigate the possiblities of implementing the results of a research project, conducted since 2013 by AGH University of Science and Technology in Kraków and Tokyo University, concerning technologies for drying lignite.
mg.gov.pl

Brazil Tempting Poland

Welcoming Poland?

Welcoming Poland?

According to the vice president of the Polish-Brazil Chamber of Commerce Marian Karolczak, Brazil is the world’s 7th largest economy. At the same time it is the largest economy in South America. Over the past few years, the country has made great progress which has led to an improvement in living standards for its citizens. Moreover, the country itself is a member of BRICS, the world’s five major emerging economies. Mining and the energy sector have become marks of the Brazilian economy. Brazil is one of the largest producers of energy acquired from renewable resources in the world. What is more, Brazil is one of the world’s largest car manufacturers. Annually the country turns out around 3 million cars. Also it leads the way in agricultural with products such as coffee, sugar cane, banana, beans and orange juice. Unfortunately Polish-Brazil economic relations leave a lot to be desired. The participation of Brazil in Polish exports amounts to just 0.4%, imports are at 0.5%. Yet, the Polish chemical giants, Grupa Azoty, Selena and Synthos have been maintaining trade contacts with Brazil for many years. “They sell fertilizers that are not manufactured in Brazil and are very much in demand,” says vice president Karolczak. Currently, Brazil’s greatest potential lies in construction. That is because the country invests not only in the organisation of major sport events but also in housing. Significantly, Brazil needs building materials, and what Polish companies need in order to successfully operate on the Brazilian market is a good local partner. “Local entrepreneurs usually only speak Portuguese and Brazil is fraught with extremely complicated administrative procedures. On top of that, the amount of taxes and fees that entrepreneurs are obliged to pay is around 30%,” sums up Marian Karolczak. One of the first steps that need to be taken is a bilateral agreement on avoiding double taxation in the two countries.
polskieradio.pl